Materials Coordinator at Sydney Film Festival

Student at USyd (Arts/Law IV) Sydney, Australia.

Co-host of The Post Movie Bar podcast.

 

thoxt:

Penguin Design Award 2013. The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler.
Winner of the Penguin Adult Prize - Hayley Warnham.
For full 2013 shortlist visit the site.

thoxt:

Penguin Design Award 2013. The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler.

Winner of the Penguin Adult Prize - Hayley Warnham.

For full 2013 shortlist visit the site.

(Source: penguindesign)

Nymphomaniac, 2013 - ★★★

Split into Vols 1 and 2, abridged and censored - total runtime: 4hr 1min

Don’t particularly feel passionate about this one; it’s ok. First half is more playful and structurally risky (mixed results). Second half is more engaging and better told, albeit hampered by increasingly prescriptive and frustrating duologue interjections from Gainsbourg and Skarsgard.

Shia and Slater need accent coaches, both were awful, especially LaBeouf, whose accent was so jarring it hampered characterisation and, by extension, the entire arc of his character. Thurman and Bell anchored what were the best sequences in the film, the former a great piece of black comedy, the latter a confronting scene akin to Seidl’s Paradise trilogy (but not as well shot). Gainsbourg is reasonably solid but time jump in character between her and Stacy Martin is poor.

Von Trier might be his own worst enemy in this movie, filling the film with certain crystallised concepts (painful rants about society housed in character development) and completely vague notions about sexuality and Joe as a person, who I don’t even know if I care about by the film’s end (as the second half drifts off down oddly genre-heavy narrative we feel less attached to sexual obsession in first volume).

Definitely bites off more than it can chew, dropping plot elements and bringing some in so late (soul trees as emotional catharsis?) that they mar any genuine overview of the film’s narrative movements.

Ending is fairly problematic, near audience-insulting but moreso disappointing. Felt lazy and abrupt, essentially rendering an element of the plot structure null-and-void (by extension perhaps making the entire experience of the film pointless). Mostly highlights unsatisfying way to deal with a seemingly expansive “life story”.

Logged on Letterboxd

Short Term 12, 2013 - ★★★★

A few issues with plot reveals and convenient characterisation aside, Short Term 12 is really powerful and affecting, managing to deal with some tough issues regarding children and the way in which childhood experience shapes yet doesn’t necessarily define you.

Brie Larson deserved all the praise she got and more - superb work here, adding more depth to what could have been closer to a two-dimensional sister/’moral good’ figure on the page.

Logged on Letterboxd

Only Lovers Left Alive, 2013 - ★★★½

One of the funniest Jarmusch films to date, Only Lovers Left Alive is both complex and overly simplistic, with Jarmusch wearing literary and other influences on his sleeve, to varying degrees of success (some are eyeroll inducing, others are pleasant surprises).

He’s following in the steps of The Limits of Control in infusing music into the fabric of the film, which was definitely one of the better elements of the picture. He also uses the very Jarmuschian quality of the rambling adventure (more shots of passageways in gorgeous backstreets) yet it’s less freeform here - often scenes resemble that of a stageplay.

Commentary on art and the world doesn’t entirely work, it feels somewhat strained and an unoriginal conceit/voice.

Acting is solid all round, Swinton especially, but that’s to be expected.

Despite not quite embodying the masterpiece everyone else on Letterboxd seems to think it is, there’s no one else making movies like this and it’s a welcome diversion from the norm.

Logged on Letterboxd

Blue Is the Warmest Color, 2013 - ★★★★

Some issues with the characterisation of Emma and a weirdly academic approach to sex scenes relative to the superb emotive dialogue sequences.

However, great first hour and powerful final act serve as emotional bookends, Exarchopolous is great. Unexpected mediation on regret and tunnel vision was affecting beyond mere romatic dissolution.

Logged on Letterboxd

seekandspeak:

The theatrical one-sheet I designed for Drafthouse Film’s release of Borgman.

This is fantastic.

seekandspeak:

The theatrical one-sheet I designed for Drafthouse Film’s release of Borgman.

This is fantastic.