Managing Editor at 4:3

Formerly at SBS and Sydney Film Festival.

Student at USyd (Arts/Law V) Sydney, Australia.

 

I figured the snazzy new US poster for Godard’s Goodbye to Language could use some very basic GIF-work.

I figured the snazzy new US poster for Godard’s Goodbye to Language could use some very basic GIF-work.

(Source: twitter.com)

Spent all afternoon Photoshopping this for the 4:3 Facebook page. 17 films featured in the image. Bragging rights of an extremely useless kind if you can guess them all.

Spent all afternoon Photoshopping this for the 4:3 Facebook page. 17 films featured in the image. Bragging rights of an extremely useless kind if you can guess them all.

beatonna:

If you enjoyed poking fun at genres with Femme Fatale, and if you like smart parody, give Nonsense Novels by Stephen Leacock a spin.  It’s one of my favourite humour collections of all time.  Leacock is perhaps not very well known outside his native land, but he is a grandfather of parody, among the best of them.  Nonsense Novels was first published in 1911, and takes on several literary tropes, the first - as you see here - is the Great Detective.  The link is to a nice pdf of the whole book.

This is absolutely hysterical.

beatonna:

If you enjoyed poking fun at genres with Femme Fatale, and if you like smart parody, give Nonsense Novels by Stephen Leacock a spin.  It’s one of my favourite humour collections of all time.  Leacock is perhaps not very well known outside his native land, but he is a grandfather of parody, among the best of them.  Nonsense Novels was first published in 1911, and takes on several literary tropes, the first - as you see here - is the Great Detective.  The link is to a nice pdf of the whole book.

This is absolutely hysterical.

Had a documentary double today at Antenna Documentary Film Festival here in Sydney:
Non-Fiction Diary (pictured above), which uses media coverage of South Korea’s first group of serial killers to make quite a salient point about justice and government power more broadly | Review
The 50 Year Argument, Scorsese co-directs a documentary about The New York Review of Books, is suprisingly moving | Review

Had a documentary double today at Antenna Documentary Film Festival here in Sydney:

  • Non-Fiction Diary (pictured above), which uses media coverage of South Korea’s first group of serial killers to make quite a salient point about justice and government power more broadly | Review
  • The 50 Year Argument, Scorsese co-directs a documentary about The New York Review of Books, is suprisingly moving | Review
Gone Girl (Fincher, 2014) - Review

David Fincher is never content with the easy answer or the simple narrative. While traversing the idea of crime time and time again, with detectives, journalists, suspects and even potential intellectual property thieves, the roles characters appear to fulfil on the surface never fully encompass their true selves – there’s always something under the floorboards, and Fincher intends on ripping them apart to find the beating heart. With Gone Girl, it’s no different – a surface-level suburban whodunnit that spirals into a near-delirious look at the media circus, a fickle and bored public and the way in which we perceive ourselves, using marriage as a thematic conceit.

Read full review at 4:3

Gone Girl (Fincher, 2014) - Review

David Fincher is never content with the easy answer or the simple narrative. While traversing the idea of crime time and time again, with detectives, journalists, suspects and even potential intellectual property thieves, the roles characters appear to fulfil on the surface never fully encompass their true selves – there’s always something under the floorboards, and Fincher intends on ripping them apart to find the beating heart. With Gone Girl, it’s no different – a surface-level suburban whodunnit that spirals into a near-delirious look at the media circus, a fickle and bored public and the way in which we perceive ourselves, using marriage as a thematic conceit.

Read full review at 4:3

theryanconnolly:

Lately I’ve been doing a director specific film study. I choose a filmmaker and examine my way through their body of work. Currently, I am working my way through David Fincher’s films, most recently with 'Se7en'.

Watching it again, it’s crazy to realize how many films it has inspired, even credit sequences (American Horror Story). But the main thing that I’m obsessed with is the look of the film, the bleak noir style that Fincher and Darius Khondji crafted so perfectly.

These are a few of my favorite shots from the film. I can only post ten at a time on Tumblr, it was painful to leave so many amazing shots out… I Love the use of practicals in some of these frames.

Conor Bateman's ★½ review of The Immigrant (2013)

The Immigrant got an absolute rave review from one of my co-editors at 4:3 (it’s a well-written piece too and worth looking at, especially if you loved the film) and so I went in knowing that it could be a contender for one of the year’s best.

Turns out I had a totally unpleasant viewing experience, the film felt so forced and false to me, as if the entire narrative was stuck on rails, and I ended up feeling like it was one of the worst things I had seen all year. Because this view was so completely out of step with almost all critical opinion, I sat down and wrote up what started as a messy collection of thoughts and morphed into a 2400-word “review” of the film. After all that, I still can’t bring myself to even slightly like The Immigrant.

Jumping Filmmakers photographed by Alex Majoli 

Gus Van Sant, Wim Winders, Aki Kaurismaki

Wong Kar Wai, Tsai Ming-Liang, Takeshi Kitano

Tim Burton, Manoel de Oliviera, Olivier Assayas

Ken Loach, David Cronenberg, Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarritu

Cristian Mungiu, The Dardenne Brothers, Theodoros Angelopoulos

Pedro Almodovar, Souleymane Cisse & Quentin Tarantino 

(Source: andreii-tarkovsky)